Why sustainable seafood is a data problem


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A diver in the Revillagigedo Archipelago interacts with giant mantas as part of a citizen science cruise led by Dr. Alfredo Giron.

Alfredo Giron

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Alfredo Giron

A diver in the Revillagigedo Archipelago interacts with giant mantas as part of a citizen science cruise led by Dr. Alfredo Giron.

Alfredo Giron

The last several decades have taken a toll on the oceans: Some fish populations are collapsing, plastic is an increasing problem and climate change is leading to coral bleaching — as well as a host of other problems. But marine biologist and World Economic Forum programme lead Alfredo Giron says there’s room to hope for the seas. He works to create systems that governments and the fishing industry can use to make sure fishing is legal and sustainable so oceans thrive for years to come. In this encore episode, he talks to host Aaron Scott about his work and how managing the ocean is a lot about managing people.

We spoke to Alfredo Giron about his research and thoughts, the episode is not meant to reflect the World Economic Forum’s positions.

Have questions about the world around you? Email us at [email protected].

Today’s episode was produced by Thomas Lu and Rebecca Ramirez, edited by senior supervising editor Gisele Grayson, and fact-checked by Brit Hanson. The audio engineer for this episode was Kwesi Lee. Our senior director of programming is Beth Donovan. And the senior vice president of programming is Anya Grundmann.

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