United Nations’ approval of Kenya-led security mission in Haiti causes mixed reactions

NORTH MIAMI, Fla. – WSRF 1580AM & 99.5 FM, marketed as The Haitian-American Radio Station of South Florida, delivers the news in Kreyòl. There has been a high demand for updates as rival gangs fight for power in Haiti.

The radio station airs Severe Livincouer’s “Explosion Show With Severe,” which focuses on discussions about the Caribbean country’s politics, culture, and economy.

Livincouer, who lives in North Miami, voices his opinions, and he is among those who stand against international intervention in Haiti despite the ongoing security crisis.

“The guns, the ammunitions, they come from the U.S.,” Livincouer said.

The United Nations Security Council’s approval authorizing Kenya to lead the one-year deployment of an international force to Haiti concerns him. The U.S. pledged $100 million to help strengthen the security forces.

Jean Jonassaint, a Haitian writer who teaches at Syracuse University, is among those who agree with Livincouer and he believes the international community needs to focus on economic improvements and not policing.

“We don’t have good results from intervention in Haiti since 1915,” Jonassaint said also adding, “I don’t think Kenya is the right country.”

Former United Nations armed forces in Haiti were at the center of a child sex abuse scandal and of a cholera outbreak killing about 10,000 caused by a camp’s sewage runoff. Critics worried about Kenya’s record of police brutality.

On Sept. 22, Haiti’s Prime Minister Ariel Henry told the international community at the United Nations that his country desperately needs help as his military and law enforcement forces haven’t been able to keep up with the violence.

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After several kidnappings for ransom, the U.S. State Department warned U.S. citizens to leave and stay away from Haiti. Eduardo Gamarra, a professor of international relations at Florida International University, said support is essential.

“Right now, I don’t think that Haiti is a viable nation-state without external intervention,” Gamarra said.

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